Vocational Education


Vocational Education

Historically, the aim of vocational education has been to prepare pupils for occupations that require less theoretical instruction than that of a university career. Many governments made some modification into their educational systems to include vocational programs, but they had to decrease their unemployment rates, because vocational education encourages high-school students to continue to develop their technical skills.

Vocational education became more prominent in European, Asian and North American countries at the end of the 19th century, and it's currently considered as a key factor to improve and maintain the competitiveness of enterprises and national economies. Vocational education has become a priority in countries such as Japan and China, because they are manufacturing countries and students with marketable skills are valuable.

Vocational education offers a large list of technical and commercial programs; if students complete a program successfully, trade schools provide them with a certificate in the field they were taught. Vocational education has programs that require less time than a university career, most students spend from 2 to 3 years to become professional technicians. Professors use traditional method to teach vocational courses.

Vocational education has a flexible curriculum, most programs are practical and they only have a few theory classes. This curriculum retains links with the real world, because vocational education is oriented towards satisfying the demand of the labor market. Vocational education offers a great alternative for all high-school students who can't support their higher education or want to work right after completing their studies at high school.

Vocational education in the United States
 Vocational education in the United States
Trade schools are usually known as postsecondary schools so many times this kind of instruction takes place during the last years of high school. Most American students attend trade schools.